Latest Articles

Bruce Kasanoff: My Two-Month Crash Course on SlideShare

bruce kasanoffLong-time Hired Gun Bruce Kasanoff recently got serious press for his SlideShare prowess. The article below originally appeared on SlideShare’s site.

Author and entrepreneur Bruce Kasanoff dove head-first into SlideShare: With barely any previous experience on the site, he uploaded 13 presentations in two months. He did something right — five of his presentations were the most-viewed SlideShares of the week, and he’s gotten a total of more than 270,000 views. The Now Possible managing director and LinkedIn Influencer shares the lessons he learned along the way.

Although I’d previously published a few pieces on Slideshare, it wasn’t until two months ago I got serious about sharing my ideas here. Here’s what I’ve learned so far:    Read More →

Why Do Women Stay in Unfulfilling Jobs?

Woman doing menial workIt’s easy to get comfortable in a job. After all, who doesn’t like a little comfort in a hectic world? But perhaps you’ve stayed too long in one place, even though a small voice in the back of your head keeps nagging that you really should move on. So why don’t you?

It’s not just anecdotal evidence that suggests this issue is particularly common among women (although there’s certainly enough of that). Academic research has shown that when women stay in a job for several years, they’re less likely to leave than a man.    Read More →

5 Deadly Resume Errors People Still Make

WW2 Plane CrashEvery hiring manager and HR pro out there has seen their share of terrible resumes. Here at The Hired Guns, we see them constantly, and our collective heart breaks for those earnest, well-intentioned souls who are just trying a tad too hard to score an interview. Usually, I reach out and offer them some pointers and direct them to some useful resources for fixing whatever abomination they just sent us. I’ve been working in the career game for quite some time, and have seen literally thousands of resumes. Here are five of the most egregious resume errors I somehow still see on a regular basis.    Read More →

The Publicis-Omnicom Merger: Not Big Data, Just Big Business

Omnicom-Publicis MergerAs a longtime observer of the advertising industry, I couldn’t help noticing yesterday’s announcement that two of the world’s largest advertising agencies — Publicis and Omnicom — were merging into what I can only guess will be called Uber-Omnicom. It’s two old-guard agencies trying to become better equipped to trade in data analysis and automated ad buying. But as much as they’ll tell you it’s about big data, it’s really about big business.      Read More →

How I Changed Careers Without Really Trying

Changing careersWhen I was 25, I was working in marketing at American Heritage magazine, then a division of Forbes. I loved my job. I got to walk through the Forbes Galleries as I came into work each morning. I loved the in-house gym and the occasional trips on the Forbes yacht, the Highlander … but I digress.

But as much as I enjoyed those things, the real reason I loved my job was because it was both creative and analytical. I thought I was on track to be a magazine marketing guru, with a fancy title at a prestigious publication that reflected a personal passion. Life, however, had other plans.    Read More →

4 Ways to Bridge the Creative – Account Divide

"How hard can it be to write copy?"Creative people are the heart and soul of every good agency. They create art in service to commerce. The rest of us just sell it. That doesn’t, of course, mean that savvy account and strategy people can’t make significant — or even crucial — contributions to the creative process. We certainly can. We just have to do it right.

Ideally, account and planning types support the creative team by finding relevant insights, mining customer data, understanding the customer’s journey from awareness to purchase, and by projecting client business goals and communications sensibilities. Ideally, the support team packages all this up as a springboard for the creative, who then internalize the brief and make the magic.

Real life, however, is messier. The dynamic between your accounts and creative teams might be genial. It might also be tense or even hostile. It all depends on how you manage it. A long career in ad land has taught me a lot about bridging that gap and helping your creatives deliver great work, time after time. Here are four strategies I always come back to.    Read More →

Salary Negotiation Doesn’t Have to be a Nightmare

Nail Biting“What’s your desired salary?” Few elements of the job search create as much fear, anxiety, uncertainty, and unadulterated panic as those four little words. At The Hired Guns, we’re always coaching people on salary and benefits negotiation. A large part of that process involves dispelling rumors and disabusing professionals of the terrible advice they’ve accumulated from friends, family, and fevered Google searches.

Negotiating your salary at a new job doesn’t need to be frustrating or confusing. It doesn’t need to involve white-knuckle terror or lying through your teeth. When done right, it’s a simple, straightforward process that leaves both sides of the table satisfied.    Read More →

6 Ways You’re Blowing Your Job Interview (Without Even Realizing It)

Toilet paper on shoeJen Geller is The Hired Guns’ resident Talent Booker. This is her first post.

I have a weird specialty. I do interviews. Specifically, I make them happen. I’ve been setting them up, preparing people, and dealing with the fallout from ones that have gone awry for over a decade. And boy, do they go awry. A lot.

I’ve set up interviews as a TV producer and as a conference producer, and now I do it here at The Hired Guns. If you go on a job interview through The Hired Guns, you and I will work together. I’ll call you, prep you, send you a confirmation email, and make sure you’re ready to dazzle. But sometimes, no matter how prepared and enthusiastic people are, no matter how ready they are to absolutely nail it, they can still undermine all their hard work by making the simplest mistakes.

These aren’t “interview fails.” They’re not major catastrophes or colossal meltdowns. But they are things that will weaken your chances. They’re also things you probably have no idea that you’re doing.    Read More →

10 Lessons Freelancers Can Learn from a Flying Wallenda

Nik Wallenda

While breathlessly watching Nik Wallenda’s teeth-clenching, death-defying, and awe-inspiring tightrope walk across the Grand Canyon, I found myself reminded of another type of daredevil: freelancers.

While most of us are not literally going to plummet to our death if we make a mistake, as a freelancer it can often feel like we are all alone in the world, trying to get from Point A to Point B, hundreds of feet in the air without a safety net.

So what can a Flying Wallenda teach us about the solo wire-walking act that we have to do every single day?    Read More →

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